Author Kyle Perkins

Top 20 Funniest TV Shows of All Time(as of 2017).



I’ve done Best Tv Dramas, and I’ve done Most Disturbing. Now, it’s time for the funniest TV shows of all times!

20. American Vandal.

A true-crime satire that explores the aftermath of a costly high school prank that left twenty-seven faculty cars vandalized with phallic images.

19. Wilfred.

The story of Ryan, a depressed man who believes he is getting nowhere in his life and plans to kill himself. In the middle of his attempted suicide, he is asked to watch his neighbor’s dog, Wilfred, but Ryan can only see Wilfred as a real person instead of an animal that everyone else sees. As they begin to bond more and become friends, Wilfred teaches Ryan a life lesson about people, love, and living.

18. Archer.

At an international spy agency, global crises are merely opportunities for its highly trained employees to confuse, undermine, betray and royally screw each other. At the center of it all is suave master spy Sterling Archer, whose less-than-masculine code name is “Duchess.” Archer works with his domineering mother Malory, who also is his boss. He also has to deal with his ex-girlfriend, Agent Lana Kane and her new boyfriend, comptroller Cyril Figgis, as well as Malory’s lovesick secretary, Cheryl.

17. Louie.

Louie is a stand-up comedian and divorced father of two girls. This series follows him through his everyday life, as he meets various characters, struggles with his love life and pursues humor.

16. Freaks and Geeks.

It’s the 1980s and at McKinley High, there’s two different groups of teenagers, the Freaks with cool and charismatic Daniel Desario and tomboy Lindsay Weir and the Geeks with Lindsay’s shy younger brother Sam, gentle Bill Haverchuck, and self-proclaimed ladies’ man Neal Schweiber. The show chronicles the normal teen/adolescence problems any teenager goes through including acceptance, drugs, drinking, and bullying.

15. Insecure.

Follows the awkward experiences and racy tribulations of a modern-day African-American woman.

14. Atlanta.

Based in Atlanta, Earn and his cousin Alfred are trying to make their way up in the world through the rap scene. Along the way they come face to face with social and economic issues touching on race, relationships, poverty, status and parenthood.

13. Scream Queens

Wallace University is rocked by a string of murders. Kappa House, the most sought-after sorority for pledges, is ruled with an iron fist (in a pink glove) by its Queen Bitch, Chanel Oberlin (Emma Roberts). But when anti-Kappa Dean Cathy Munsch (Jamie Lee Curtis) decrees that sorority pledging must be open to all students, and not just the school’s silver-spooned elite, all hell is about to break loose, as a devil-clad killer begins wreaking havoc, claiming one victim, one episode at a time. Part black comedy, part slasher flick, SCREAM QUEENS is a modern take on the classic whodunit, in which every character has a motive for murder… Or could easily be the next blood-soaked casualty.

12. Drifters.

After graduating from university, twenty something year-olds Meg, her cousin Bunny and their friend Laura share a flat and face the ups and downs of love and life.

11. South Park.

The curious, adventure-seeking, fourth grade group of boys, Stan, Kyle, Cartman, and Kenny, all join in in buffoonish adventures that sometimes evolve nothing. Sometimes something that was simple at the start, turns out to get out of control. Everything is odd in the small mountain town, South Park, and the boys always find something to do with it.

10. Episodes

An English couple, Sean and Beverly Lincoln, are the creators/producers of a long- running, highly acclaimed and very popular TV show on UK TV, “Lyman’s Boys”. After receiving yet another award for the show they are approached by a US TV executive. He wants to take them to the US and make a US version of the show. After much haggling and assurances that the show will remain largely unchanged they agree. Once in the US they discover that the proposed show is quite different to the UK version. Their greatest dismay, however, is reserved for the fact that their venerable lead actor is to be replaced by Friends star Matt Le Blanc.

9. Fleabag.

A six-part comedy series adapted from the award-winning play about a young woman trying to cope with life in London whilst coming to terms with a recent tragedy.

8. Workaholics.

A single-camera comedy featuring three friends who work together as telemarketers from 9 to 5, and live together from 5 to 9.

7. Vice Principals.

A dark comedy series about a high school and the two vice principals. McBride and Walton Goggins star as the V.P.s who are in an epic power struggle, vying for the top spot: to be school principal.

6. Trailer Park Boys.

Trailer Park Boys is about life between prison terms. Always trying to play the angles, always done-in by forces beyond their control, and always in the middle of a gunfight, Ricky and Julian are decent, hard- working guys trying to cope with the New World Economic Order. It’s not that the boys don’t know right from wrong, it’s just that “right” rarely presents itself.

5. Silicon Valley.

In the high-tech gold rush of modern Silicon Valley, the people most qualified to succeed are the least capable of handling success. A comedy partially inspired by Mike Judge’s own experiences as a Silicon Valley engineer in the late 1980s.

4. The Office.

A mediocre paper company in the hands of Scranton, PA branch manager Michael Scott. This mockumentary follows the everyday lives of the manager and the employees he “manages.” The crew follows the employees around 24/7 and captures their quite humerous and bizarre encounters as they will do what it takes to keep the company thriving.

3. It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

Five egocentric friends who run a neighborhood Irish pub in Philadelphia try to find their way through the adult world of work and relationships. Unfortunately, their warped views and precarious judgments often lead them to trouble, creating myriad uncomfortable situations that usually only get worse before they get better.

2. Eastbound & Down.

Kenny Powers was poised to rule the Big Leagues, but two things got in the way: his fading fastball and his insufferable personality. After a spectacular career flame-out, Kenny goes home to Shelby County, NC, to nurse his wounds and work as a gym teacher at his old middle school.

1. The Inbetweeners.

The exploits of four friends, who are socially only marginally above what one of them calls “the freaks”, are presented as they grow from their late teen years into adults and as they go on their quest, usually unsuccessfully, for such grown up things as beer and sex. Simon Cooper, Jay Cartwright and Neil Sutherland have been friends for some time. Insecure Simon’s main quest in life is to get long time friend, Carli D’Amato, to be his girlfriend. Jay is the big talker whose stories, especially about his sexual conquests, are more fantasy than reality. And slightly dim-witted Neil is generally two steps behind everyone else in comprehension of life, and who is always defending his father from beliefs that he’s a closet homosexual. Into the group comes its fourth member, Will McKenzie, who met them when he transferred into their school, Rudge Park Comprehensive, at the start of sixth form, as Will’s newly divorced mum could no longer afford his private school tuition. Nerdish and straight-laced Will, ridiculed for carrying a briefcase, insinuated himself in the group – not aiming his sights too high – as he tried not to be labeled as one of the freaks. Regardless, he is still the target of the school’s “psycho bully”, Mark Donovan, and the head of Rudge Park’s sixth form, Mr. Gilbert. Will’s initial saving grace in bonding with his new mates may have been that they all want to shag his pretty but protective mother, Polly.

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